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College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

anthropology

Student Assessment

Student Outcomes Assessment Anthropology

University of Northern Iowa Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology

PHILOSOPHY & GOALS AND OUTCOMES

2017

Bachelor of Arts: Anthropology

Philosophy of Student Outcomes Assessment

Student Outcomes Assessment for the Anthropology Program is designed to help Anthropology faculty identify strengths and weaknesses in the overall program on the basis of student achievement.  Student Assessment centers on evaluating skills and perspectives that are not easily evaluated through successful course completion alone. These include skills and understandings that have applications related both to responsible living and to success in the working world, regardless of whether or not the student plans a career in anthropology.

Goals and Outcomes       

GOAL I.         Anthropology students will understand the nature of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four subfields (Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology and Biological Anthropology). Students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1    identify major anthropological theories and historical figures in: Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology.

Outcome 1.2    critically evaluate anthropological theories in Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology.

Outcome 1.3   critically apply anthropological theories in relation to empirical evidence.

GOAL II.        Anthropology students will be able to apply the anthropological cross-cultural perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live. Students will be able to:   

Outcome 2.1    explain how culture, biology and the environment interact in shaping human behavior and use those ideas to critique stereotypes about people and populations.

Outcome 2.2    explain how colonialism and globalization have affected and are currently affecting societies around the world.

Outcome 2.3    practice global literacy by interacting across cultural, linguistic and political boundaries.

GOAL III.      Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to analyze at least two types of anthropological data used in the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and physical (biological) anthropology.

Students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1    collect the appropriate data in a research project related to at least two of the following:  ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data. 

Outcome 3.2    organize and catalogue at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data.  

Outcome 3.3    analyze and interpret at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data. 

GOAL IV.      Anthropology students will possess the skills of a practicing anthropologist. Students will be able to:

Outcome 4.1    apply critical thinking and creative thinking (e.g., think outside the box, identify new problems, create new solutions) to anthropological problems.

Outcome 4.2    use a variety of library resources (print and electronic) to produce written documents and oral presentations for a variety of audiences.

Outcome 4.3    explain how their undergraduate training and anthropological knowledge are relevant and of value to potential employers as well as to graduate or professional schools.

Outcome 4.4    identify key ethical issues in anthropology.