College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Past Student Learning Outcomes

Past Student Learning Outcomes

2017-2019

GOAL I.   Anthropology students will understand the nature of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four subfields (Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology and Biological Anthropology). Students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1          identify major anthropological theories and historical figures in: Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology.
Outcome 1.2          critically evaluate anthropological theories in Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology.
Outcome 1.3   critically apply anthropological theories in relation to empirical evidence.

 

GOAL II. Anthropology students will be able to apply the anthropological cross-cultural perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live. Students will be able to:

Outcome 2.1          explain how culture, biology and the environment interact in shaping human behavior and use those ideas to critique stereotypes about people and populations.
Outcome 2.2          explain how colonialism and globalization have affected and are currently affecting societies around the world.
Outcome 2.3          practice global literacy by interacting across cultural, linguistic and political boundaries.

 

GOAL III.                  Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to analyze at least two types of anthropological data used in the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and physical (biological) anthropology.  Students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1          collect the appropriate data in a research project related to at least two of the following:  ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.  
Outcome 3.2          organize and catalogue at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.  
Outcome 3.3          analyze and interpret at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.

 

GOAL IV. Anthropology students will possess the skills of a practicing anthropologist. Students will be able to:

Outcome 4.1          apply critical thinking and creative thinking (e.g., think outside the box, identify new problems, create new solutions) to anthropological problems.
Outcome 4.2          use a variety of library resources (print and electronic) to produce written documents and oral presentations for a variety of audiences.
Outcome 4.3          explain how their undergraduate training and anthropological knowledge are relevant and of value to potential employers as well as to graduate or professional schools.
Outcome 4.4          identify key ethical issues in anthropology

 

2015-2017

Goal 1.  Anthropology students will understand the nature of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four subfields (Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology and Biological Anthropology. Students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1  identify major anthropological theories and historical figures in Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology.
Outcome 1.2  critically apply and evaluate anthropological theories in relation to empirical evidence.

 

Goal II.  Anthropology students will be able to apply the anthropological cross-cultural perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live. Students will be able to:

Outcome 2.1  explain how culture, biology and the environment interact in shaping human behavior and use those ideas to critique stereotypes about people and populations.
Outcome 2.2  explain how colonization and globalization have affected and are currently affecting societies around the world.
Outcome 2.3  practice global literacy by interacting across cultural, linguistic and political boundaries.

 

Goal III.  Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to analyze at least two types of anthropological data used in the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and physical (biological) anthropology. Students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1  collect the appropriate data in a research project related to at least two of the following: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.
Outcome 3.2  organize and catalogue at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.
Outcome 3.3  analyze and interpret at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, human skeletal data.

 

Goal IV. Anthropology students will possess the skills of a practicing anthropologist. Students will be able to:

Outcome 4.1  apply critical thinking and creative thinking (e.g., think outside of the box, identify new problems, create new solutions) to anthropological problems.
Outcome 4.2  use a variety of library resources (print and electronic) to produce written documents and oral presentations for a variety of audiences. 
Outcome 4.3  explain how their undergraduate training and anthropological knowledge are relevant and of value to potential employers as well as to graduate or professional schools. 
Outcome 4.4  identify key ethical issues in anthropology.

 

2010-2012

1.         Anthropology students will demonstrate knowledge of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four major sub-fields (Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology and Biological Anthropology).

2.         Anthropology students will apply the anthropological perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live.

3.         Anthropology students will explain the role of Anthropology in their career and future goals.

4.         Anthropology students will demonstrate the skills to conduct library research, to communicate verbally, and to write in the form according to the standards of the discipline.

 

 

2008-2010

OUTCOME I.    Anthropology students will understand the nature of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four major sub-fields (Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology and Biological Anthropology).

Competency 1.1          Be familiar with major anthropological theories and historical figures in: Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology.
Competency 1.2          Be able to understand cultural relativism and the holistic perspective.
Competency 1.3          Have experience with the methods of anthropological research.
Competency 1.4          Be able to explain to an individual who has not studied archaeology why the common practice of collecting artifacts found in the woods is wrong from a scientific, ethical and often legal perspective.
Competency 1.5          Be able to articulate evolutionary change as it relates to the origin of the human species.
Competency 1.6          Be able to give specific examples of how differences in communication patterns can lead to cross-cultural misunderstanding or hostility.

 

OUTCOME II.   Anthropology students will be able to apply the anthropological perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live.

Competency 2.1          Be able to articulate how studying anthropology has increased awareness of how the student’s beliefs and behaviors are shaped by culture.
Competency 2.2          Be able to discuss how culture, biology and the environment interact in shaping human behavior.
Competency 2.3          Be critical when it comes to interpreting generalizations about human behavior. 
Competency 2.4          Be able to relate and critically apply anthropological knowledge in a variety of situations outside of the classroom.